Vessel: The Process Behind the Painting

The purpose of the vessel painting was to see how I could utilize a limited palette while creating a series of paintings. This is what has been a lifelong struggle, due to the fact that it's so easy to develop unconscious habits- settling into a specific color arrangement in one painting but wanting to change that in other subsequent paintings within the same series.

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Essentially, I'm looking to find exciting possibilities -ways to arrange color differently while using a specific unchanging palette color set up. Usually in a series of paintings there'll be a few paintings that look too similar in the way the color is structured from a color value composition. Reds will normally be in a specific spot, yellows usually in the front as a 'lighting' effect... Color layout is every artist's game. My concerns are simple: What colors are dominant and are they interacting with each other differently than the other paintings in the series?

My concerns are simple: What colors are dominant and are they interacting with each other differently than the other paintings in the series?

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In the painting, the form within the composition becomes the narrative. It is based on my memory of a ceramic vessel I made while I was studying under a teacher named Ishmael Soto (who passed a few years go). The figure stands within the content of space hence its automatic figuration. Often the intention of making something is more or less creating something to address a problem.

Producing painting with just a palette knife started in grad school as a way to minimize paint waste and mixing colors right where I wanted them to be. I love the rough texture -- it changes the refraction, quite different compared to a piece painted with a brush. A palette knife creates a 'bodied' sculptural element, layering cement on top of cement, tinted with heavy mass colors. The result is something seductive and earthy, tactility married with materiality.